Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming

Grinding to a Standstill? Search For New Downtown Traffic Plan

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Downtown Brooklyn is the focus of a blueprint study that hopes to address transportation for the next 20 years, but many residents complained that the area already has many problems that need to be fixed.

The transit system, streets, highways, sidewalks, bike paths and more from the waterfront to Union Street and Washington Avenue will be scrutinized by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and other city and state agencies in the blueprint study.

‘Meeting One’ Ventures Into Traffic Morass

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It was called Public Meeting # 1, as if there had never been another one, but it was indeed the first public meeting on the plan to conduct a comprehensive traffic study for downtown Brooklyn, which is called a "transportation blueprint."

To be conducted by the city's Department of Transportation and its consultants, the study results from the new downtown Brooklyn rezoning effort, which made it obvious that stated development plans could produce major traffic problems.

Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Project: Final Report, May 2003

Downtown Brooklyn Traffic Calming Project: Final Report, May 2003 Please note: several of these files contain images too large to be read from a web browser window. ; If you encounter errors, please save the file to your hard drive (right-click on the link and "Save Target As" on a Windows PC running Internet Explorer) and open it from there. Department of Transportation list of

Goverment Employees Avoid Park Slope Traffic Forum Jam

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<p>"If you plan for more cars and traffic," promised Fred Kent, the president of the Project for Public Spaces, "then you get more cars and traffic. If you plan for people and places, you get more people and places."</p> <p>Kent is an internationally renowned expert on urban planning, and he regularly travels from New Jersey to Canada to Europe. He calls Brooklyn home, but never works here.</p>

Yo, Bloomberg: It's time to solve the Brooklyn transit problem

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<p>Brooklyn may be booming, but what good is it if the streets in the borough's core are clogged, pedestrians are stymied, and the landscape unwelcoming? And why are we so far behind European cities, and even New Jersey? It's time, said participants at a forum last night on "Traffic and Transportation in Brownstone Brooklyn," to pressure public officials and city agencies to think more broadly.</p>

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