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Resources: Maps


Hudson Valley Bikeways & Trailways

Each section is approximately 800 X 900 pixels.  This map is also available in PDF format from the NYC State DOT.

Please see also Shorewalkers' Battery Park to Bear Mountain Trail Map in PDF format. [alternate file location]

Excerpted from the reverse of this NYSDOT map:

USE OF THIS MAP

This map is provided for information purposes only and is nor a representation as to safety or the appropriateness of the facilities for use by bicyclists and pedestrians. The mapped bikeways and trailways are not a guarantee of safety.

These bikeways and trailways have not been rated or field tested by the New York Stare Department of Transportation (NYSDOT). By compilation and distribution of this map, the NYSDOT and all political subdivisions and agencies of the State of New York or its assignees assume no responsibility of any nature for damages or injury to persons or property arising our of or resulting from travel on any bikeways, trailways or bike routes displayed herein, and accordingly disclaim any and all liability on its part for such damage or injuries should they occur. (This information has been based on information at time of printing only, and does not reflect any future changes that may occur to bikeways, trailways, bike routes and road surfaces.)

HUDSON VALLEY BIKEWAYS & TRAILWAYS

The Hudson Valley of New York is known throughout the world for its scenic beauty. Walking or hiking provides the opportunity to appreciate this beauty more intimately. This map is produced by the Region 8 Office of the New York State Department of Transportation which comprises the following seven counties in the mid-Hudson Valley Region: Columbia, Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Ulster and Westchester. 

The Hudson Valley has many existing bicycle and walking opportunities and more are being built, designed, and planned. This map shows what facilities are open today and those that should be available in the future. The map doesn't show the facilities available within local and state parks or local communities, but does show facilities that do link or will link the various communities in the mid-Hudson Valley Region. 

Walking and bicycling are a means of transportation that is energy efficient, generates no air pollution, provides the health benefits of exercise, and is consistent with compact traditional communities. For these reasons the New York State Department of Transportation, the metropolitan planning organizations (MPO), local governments and other agencies and organizations an creating a extensive network of bicycle and pedestrian facilities. These range from sidewalks in cities and villages to shoulders for walking and cycling in rural areas to regional trailways on their own rights of-way. 

These facilities will encourage people to bike and walk to go to work school, shop and recreate. This can lead to more compact communities and a lessened dependence on the automobile. In turn, less use of the automobile will result in less air pollution and less energy use Improvements in the transit system in the mid-Hudson Valley an complemented by better access to the transit system by pedestrian' and bicyclists.

BIKEWAYS AND TRAILWAYS 

Bikeways and trailways are divided into three general categories on this map. 

1) Trailways or Shared Use Paths are completely separated from vehicular traffic and within an independent right-of-way or the right-of-way of another facility. There may be occasional at-grade crossings of roads by the trailway. Non-motorized shared use path; such as rail-trails, trailways, greenways, shared by both bicyclists pedestrians and other users are also included in this category. 

Where appropriate and as funding is available additional facilities will be developed. A number of right-of-ways exist, such as abandoned railroads, parkways, utility corridors and the New York City Aqueduct System right-of-ways, which can be developed into shared use paths, trailways, bike paths, or greenways. 

2) Bike Routes - share the traveled right-of-way with motor vehicles (share the roadway - highway shoulder or marked bike lane 01 bicycles use same travel lanes as motor vehicles) and are designated by signing and/or pavement markings only. Highway shoulders an the most common form of bicycle route provisions. By law all roads are open to bicyclists (except where specifically prohibited such as Interstates and limited access highways such as parkways and some arterial highways, etc.). Motorists, bicyclists, in-line skaters and pedestrians are required by law to share the travelway on all roads except where they are prohibited. 

State Bicycle Routes - are intended for experienced adult bicyclists who can share the road with motorized traffic and are primarily for transportation purposes. These routes are not recommended for children or inexperienced bicyclists due to the speed and volume of traffic generally encountered on most state highways. It is recommended that inexperienced adult bicyclists, families and children utilize the region's bike paths, rail trails, trailways and lower volume / lower speed bicycle routes or roadways. Additional State bicycle routes will be designated over rime. NYSDOT designates state bicycle routes through its regional or MPO planning processes or at the request of local municipalities. A state designated bike route is signed with a bike route number that generally corresponds with the number of the state highway route it follows in locations where the bike route meets NYSDOT standards. 

Over time as state bike routes and other related transportation facilities are rehabilitated or reconstructed, various types of bike- ways (wide shoulders, bike lanes, wide travel lanes, alternate routing, bike paths, etc.) will be developed as needed along these bicycle routes by NYSDOT in consultation with local governments and interested parries. In some cases both on-road and off-road parallel bicycle/pedestrian facilities may be built to meet the demands of the range of users. Refer to the map for existing open, planned and proposed future bike routes.

3) Major Hiking Trails - There are many outstanding hiking trails throughout the Hudson Valley and in the Catskill Park. For more information on hiking in the Hudson Valley and Catskills contact the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference; the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation; and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. This map only shows major, long distance inter-regional trails. The two major hiking trails shown are the Appalachian Trail and the Long Path. 

Appalachian Trail - The Appalachian Trail winds for over 2,150 miles, passing through 14 states from Georgia to Maine. The trail was begun in 1921 and completed in 1937 by volunteers from trail clubs and interested hikers under the leadership of the Appalachian Trail Conference. The National Trail System Act of 1968 and later amendments designated the Appalachian Trail as the first rational Scenic Trail, enabling the National Park Service to protect a permanent corridor for the Trail through an ambitious land acquisition program. The corridor averages 1,000 feet in width, 

Today it provides an easily accessible, unique experience for hikers only (no bicycling or motor vehicles). The Appalachian Trail emerges n New York Stare from the mountains of northern New Jersey crosses Orange County, then climbs through the Hudson Highlands crossing the Hudson River via the Bear Mountain Bridge at the heart of he Hudson Valley. Continuing along the Hudson Highlands the trail then heads through Putnam and Dutchess Counties before leaving the Hudson Valley Region.

Long Path - The Long Path was originally conceived in the 1930's by Vincent and Paul Schaefer of the Mohawk Valley Hiking Club who proposed that New York establish the "Long Path" similar to the Long Trail in Vermont.

Today the Long Path spans approximately 140 miles from the George Washington Bridge to the Mohawk River. The Long Path is a marked as a footpath for hiking only (no bicycles or motor vehicles). The trail provides spectacular views of New York City, Yonkers and the Hudson River for the first 12 miles before turning away from the Hudson River. The trail then goes west through Harriman State Park and then descends into Orange County generally following roads, the Orange Heritage Trailway, and the New York, Ontario and Western Railroad right of way. Beyond the Hudson Valley the Long Path climbs the escarpment of the Shawangunk Ridge with its gleaming white conglomerate. The Shawangunk Mountains offer spectacular views of the Hudson Valley and the Catskill Mountains. The trail climbs up and over cliffs, passes waterfalls and mountain lakes before descending to cross the Rondout Valley on local roads. The Long Path then continues into the Catskill Park crossing mountain tops, continues through the Helderbergs and ends at the Mohawk River. Work continues on extending the Long Path to the Adirondacks. 

For more information on these trails, trailways, or to volunteer to help conserve and improve the Appalachian Trail and Long Path, or to report problems contact the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference.

HUDSON VALLEY TRAILWAYS/SHARED USE PATHS AND GREENWAY SYSTEM 

Introduction 

A regional system of over 1000 miles of multi-use trailways/shared use paths within linear greenways is planned / for the Hudson Valley and a good portion is already constructed and open to the public. These facilities are in various phases of study, development, design and construction. See the map for additional project information and locations. In addition to trailways/shared use facilities being developed by NYSDOT and local governments the Hudson River Valley Greenway Council/Conservancy is developing complementary trails on both sides of the Hudson River and working with communities to develop trailways and greenways, improve local planning and coordinate the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area. 

The following major facilities comprise the evolving Regional Trailway/Shared Use Path and Greenway System. Trailways in blue are proposed. Trailways in black are open. 

Map Location/Trailway/lnformation 

1-East Coast Greenway-Hutchinson River Parkway Trailway -(Proposed) Westchester County

This greenway is proposed as part of a 2000 mile multi-use trail- way winding through cities, suburbs, villages and countryside from Florida to Maine, The Hudson Valley section is proposed from the New York City line to the Connecticut border. Needs substantial work for use as a trailway for multiple uses. 

Use: currently equestrian 

Status: open as equestrian path in some sections 

Surface: unpaved. 

Length: 8.0 miles. 

Ownership: NYSDOT 

Maintenance: Westchester County Parks 

Contact: Westchester County Department of Parks,
Recreation and Conservation
25 Moore Avenue, Mt. Kisco, NY 10549,
(914) 864-PARK
www.westchestergov.com
www.greenway.org

2-Bronx River Pathway-(Open)-Westchester County 

The pathway is located along the Bronx River Parkway. The Parkway, not the trail*, extends 13.2 miles in Westchester from New York City to the Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open 

Surface: paved 

Length: 9.6 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Westchester County Parks 

Contact: Westchester County Department of Parks,
Recreation and Conservation
25 Moore Avenue, Mt. Kisco, NY 10549,
(914) 864-PARK
www.westchestergov.com
www.greenway.org

*The pathway developed to date consists of three segments: a one mile "loop" in Mount Vernon, a 3.6 mile section between Bronxville and Scarsdale, and a 5-mile section from Hartsdale to the Kensico Dam Plaza in Valhalla. In addition to the pathway, on Sundays during various parts of the year, a portion of the Bronx River Parkway is closed to vehicular traffic for Bicycle Sundays and In-line/Roller skating programs.

3-South County Trailway -(Open)-Westchester County

Hastings-on-Hudson to Eastview in Westchester County. 8 miles of this trailway on the Old Putnam Rail Line are paved. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open 

Surface: paved 

Length: 8.1 miles of paved trailway are complete of the proposed 16 mile trail. The other 8 miles from the New York City Line to Hastings- on-Hudson is proposed as a trailway for the future. 

Ownership/Maintenance: Westchester County Parks

Contact: Westchester County Department of Parks,
Recreation and Conservation
25 Moore Avenue, Mt. Kisco, NY 10549,
(914) 864-PARK
www.westchestergov.com
www.greenway.org

4-North County Trailway -(Open)-Westchester County 

Eastview to the Putnam County Line. Most of the Old Putnam Rail Line in this section has been developed into a paved trailway by Westchester County and the NYSDOT. One short missing link exists just to the south of where the trailway crosses under Route 117. This missing section of trailway is in design and will be constructed soon. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open 

Surface: paved 

Length: 20 miles of the 22.1 mile trail is complete.

Ownership/Maintenance: NYSDOT/ Westchester County Parks

Contact: Westchester County Department of Parks,
Recreation and Conservation
25 Moore Avenue, Mt. Kisco, NY 10549,
(914) 864-PARK
www.westchestergov.com
www.greenway.org

5-Putnam County Trailway I,II (Open) & III (Planned-in design)

Putnam County sections of the Old Putnam Rail Line are cur- rently being designed by NYSDOT as a trailway/bike path. Putnam I runs from Westchester County Line to Mahopac, Putnam II runs from Mahopac to Carmel. Putnam III from Carmel to Brewster will begin design soon.  

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: I & II Open / III Planned 

Surface: paved Length-12 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: NYSDOT/ Putnam County 

Contact: Putnam County Planning Department, (845) 878-3480, Putnam Rail Trail Association (845) 278-2479 

6-Old Croton Aqueduct Trailway-(Open)- Westchester County 

This trailway runs on top of the Old Croton Aqueduct right-of- way (a National Historic Landmark) from the New York City Line to the New Croton Dam in Westchester County. The New York State Office Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation is responsible for the trailway which is part of the Old Croton Trailway State Park. This trailway is also designated as part of the Hudson River Valley Greenway Trail System. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open. 

Surface: unpaved 

Length: 26.2 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: NYSOPRHP-Taconic Region 

Contact: Old Croton Trailway State Park (914) 693-5259

7-Briarcliff-PeekskillTrailway-(Open)-Westchester County

This (railway runs north from the Town of Ossining to the County's Blue Mountain Reservation in Peekskill. 

Use: hiking and walking only: (bicycling prohibited). 

Status: open Surface: unpaved 

Length 12 miles. 

Ownership/Maintenance: Westchester County Parks 

Contact: Westchester County Department of Parks,
Recreation and Conservation
25 Moore Avenue, Mt. Kisco, NY 10549,
(914) 864-PARK
www.westchestergov.com
www.greenway.org

8-Blue Mountain Reservation Mountain Bike Trail- Westchester County 

Trail network primarily for mountain biking near Peekskill. 

Use: mountain biking. 

Status: open 

Surface: unpaved 

Length: 7 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Westchester County Parks 

Contact: Westchester County Department of Parks,
Recreation and Conservation
25 Moore Avenue, Mt. Kisco, NY 10549,
(914) 864-PARK
www.westchestergov.com
www.greenway.org

9-Palisades Trailway-(Proposed-ln Design) Rockland County

Within the existing right-of-way of the Palisades Interstate Parkway (a historic parkway and New York State designated scenic byway) and/or on a parallel separate alignment, a multi-use trailway is being developed that will begin at the New Jersey side of the George Washington Bridge and will eventually end at the Bear Mountain Bridge in New York State.

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: New Jersey section is in preliminary design. New York section is in preliminary design. 

Surface: paved (proposed) 

Length: 26 miles (NYS Section) 

Ownership/Maintenance: Palisades Interstate Park Commission

Contact: Palisades Interstate Park Commission (845) 786-2701 NYSDOT (845) 431-5723. 

10-Orangetown Rail Trail-(Open) Rockland County 

This rail trail runs through the Town of Orangetown in Rockland County. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open 

Surface: unpaved

Length: 5 miles

Ownership/Maintenance: Town of Orangetown

Contact: Town of Orangetown Parks & Rec (845) 359-6503

www.orangetown.com/departments/parksrec

11-Nyack Beach-Hook Mountain Greenway Trail (Open) Rockland County : This trailway runs along the shore of the Hudson River from Upper Nyack (Nyack Beach State Park) to the Village of Haverstraw. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open. 

Surface: half paved/half unpaved 

Length: 5 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Palisades Interstate Park Commission.

Contact: Palisades Interstate Park Commission (845) 786-2701

12-Jones Point Greenway Trail (Open)-Rockland County

This trailway runs along old Route 9W/Dunderberg Mountain in Bear Mountain State Park. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open. 

Surface: unpaved 

Length: 1.3 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Palisades Interstate Park Commission.

Contact: Palisades Interstate Park Commission (845) 786-2701

13-Ramapo River Greenway Trail (Proposed)-Rockland County 

This proposed greenway and trailway will run along the Ramapo River from Suffern to Harriman. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: proposed 

Surface: paved/unpaved 

Length: 20 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: various 

14-Maybrook Trailway I -(Planned-in design)-Putnam County 

Dutchess County Line (Holmes Road) to Towners (Rt 164 vicinity Bullet Hole Road). MTA Metro-North Railroad recently purchased the rail line from Beacon in Dutchess County to Brewster in Putnam County, Putnam County, NYSDOT and the Metro North Railroad are planning to build a paved trailway from the Dutchess County Line to Brewster and from Brewster to Danbury. This is the first section to be built. The paved trailway will be separated by a fence from the active rail line. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian. 

Status: in design. 

Surface: paved 

Length: 3.7 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Putnam County 

Contact-Putnam County Planning Department (845) 878-3480

15-Maybrook Trailway II -(Proposed)-Putnam County

Brewster (Pumphouse Rd) to Danbury Line (Rte 6 @ Saw Mill) This is the second section scheduled to be built. The paved trailway will be separated by a fence from the active rail line.

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: proposed. 

Surface: paved 

Length: 5.4 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Putnam County 

Contact-Putnam County Planning Department (845) 878-3480

16-Maybrook Trailway III -(Proposed)-Putnam County

Towners (Route 164) to Brewster (Pumphouse Rd) This is the third section scheduled to be built. The paved trailway will be separated by a fence from the active rail line. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: proposed. 

Surface: asphalt 

Length: 4.5 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Putnam County 

Contact: Putnam County Planning Department (845) 878-3480

17-Mid-Dutchess Trailway-(Planned-in design)- Dutchess County 

This portion of the former Maybrook railroad right-of-way runs from Hopewell Junction in Dutchess County north to the City of Poughkeepsie. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: southern section in the Town of East Fishkill is in preliminary design. Most of the right of way owned by Dutchess County and design being done by the Dutchess County Department of Public Works. 

Surface: currently unpaved 

Length: 12 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Dutchess County 

Contact: Dutchess County Department Of Public Works: (845)486-2900. 

18-Harlem Valley Rail Trail -(Open-various sections)- Dutchess and Columbia Counties 

The former Harlem Valley Railroad from Wassaic in Dutchess County to Chatham in Columbia County is being developed as a trailway within a greenway. Two paved sections of this proposed 20 mile rail trail are currently open. The first section about 8 miles runs from Amenia to Millerton in Dutchess County. The second section about 4 miles long runs from Undermountain Road to Copake Falls in Columbia County. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: open. 

Surface: paved 

Length: 12 miles open of proposed 20 mile trail.

Ownership/Maintenance: Dutchess County and New York State Office Parks Recreation Historic Preservation in Columbia County

Contact: Dutchess County Parks & Recreation
Bowdoin Park 85 Sheafe Road
Wappinger Falls, NY 12590, (845) 297-1224
or Harlem Valley Rail Trail Association, Inc.
P.O. Box 356
Millerton, NY 12546, (518) 789-9591
www.hvrt.org

19-Wilbur Boulevard Trailway-(Open)-Dutchess County

This trailway runs along Wilbur Boulevard in the City and Town of Poughkeepsie. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian 

Status: Open. 

Surface: paved 

Length: 1.2 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: City and Town of Poughkeepsie.

Contact: (845) 451-4100 

20-Orange Heritage Trailway-(0pen)-0range County 

A continuous bike path/rail trail/greenway is being built on a abandoned rail line owned by Orange County from Middletown to Harriman. The trailway includes a ten foot wide paved path with provisions for bicyclists, pedestrians and equestrians. 

Use: bicycle/pedestrian/equestrian. Currently open from Goshen to Chester in Orange County 

Status: Open, 4.2 miles of 20 mile trail

Surface: paved 

Length: 4.2 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Orange County Parks / Orange County Citizens Foundation 

Contact: (845) 294-8886 

21-Hudson Valley Trailway-(Open)-Ulster County 

This section of the former Maybrook rail line in the Town of Lloyd in Ulster County has been developed into a 2.4 mile paved multi-use trailway by the Town of Lloyd. 

Status: open. 

Surface: paved 

Length: 2.4 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Town of Lloyd 

Contact-Town of Lloyd (845) 691-2144 

22-Poughkeepsie Railroad Bridge -(Proposed Walkway)- Ulster and Dutchess Counties 

Walkway Over the Hudson a nonprofir group owns the bridge and is working to build a walkway across the Hudson River on the old Poughkeepsie Railroad Bridge. 

Status: Walkway is under construction. 

Length: 6,767 foot span 

Ownership/Maintenance: Walkway Over the Hudson 

Contact: Walkway Over the Hudson (845) 454-9649 

www.walkway.org

23-Wallkill Valley Rail Trail-South(Open)-Ulster County 

This rail trail built on the former Wallkill Valley Railroad Line runs from the New Paltz/Rosendale Town Line to the Gardiner/Shawangunk Town Line. 

Status: Open. 

Surface: unpaved 

Length: 12.2 miles 

Ownership/Maintenance: Village and Town of New Paltz and the Wallkill Valley Land Trust, Inc. 

Contact: Wallkill Valley Rail Trail Association, FOB 1048 New Paltz, NY 12561 

www.gorailtrail.org

24-Wallkill Valley Rail Trail-North(Open)-Ulster County 

The former Wallkill Valley Railroad Line from the New Paltz/Rosendale Town Line to the City of Kingston is in private ownership. The owner allows the property to be utilized as a rail trail. 

Status: open. 

Surface: unpaved 

Length: 15 miles 

25 Delaware and Hudson Canal/ New York Ontario and Western Railroad/ Heritage Trailway (Open-various sections)-Ulster, Sullivan and Orange Counties 

These historic canal and railroad rights of way are being developed as a 30 mile continuous rail trail within a greenway from the City of Kingston to the City of Port Jervis with linkage to the State of Pennsylvania. Various sections have been developed. Town of Hurley, Town of Marbletown, Town of Rochester, Town of Wawarsing and others have all developed sections of multiuse rail trail. 

Status: open. 

Surface: unpaved 

Length: 12 miles open of 30 mile trail. 

Ownership/Maintenance: various municipalities 

Contact: D&H Canal Heritage Corridor Alliance 845-331-7512 FOB 176 Rosendale NY 12472 (845) 331-7512 or (845) 339-4531

REGIONAL SYSTEM OF BIKE ROUTES 

State highways link the region's activity centers and destinations. The same places people want to travel to in their cars are often the same places bicyclists want to travel. The most cost-effective and efficient strategy to make our roads bicycle and pedestrian friendly is to provide 4' to 8' wide shoulders on state highways incrementally over rime. 

There are three steps in signing a bicycle route. The first step is proposing a route for designation. This can be done by various governmental units (State, County, Local) or Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO). The second step is to include it in a State, County, MPO or local plan. Once the plan is adopted the bicycle route is officially designated. Bicycle route designation requires that whenever work is done on the state highway or other roadway designated as a bicycle route either wide shoulders, wide outside travel lanes, bike lanes, bike paths or alternate routing be considered depending on the roadway environment, opportunities and constraints. All bridges on a bike route should have both bicycle and pedestrian provisions, as well. 

Bicycle intermodal linkages with transit through a system of improved access to transit vehicles, stations and multimodal transportation centers are being developed. Bicycle parking facilities are needed at transit linkages and generally at all destinations. 

While the bicyclist has the legal right to ride in the travel lane on most roads, a shoulder is normally provided for additional safety for bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists. Routine maintenance of the roadways generally provides a clean riding surface for the bicyclist. While the regional corridor system of State bike routes is intended to provide safe bicycling facilities, it should not be misconstrued that the mere signage or even bike lane delineation will provide safety for all bicyclists. 

Safety education and enforcement programs help minimize bicycle/ motor vehicle conflict and clarify the rights and responsibilities of motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians to share the roads. The following state highway corridors have been designated to date as a part of the regional system of state bike routes. They were chosen for their linkage to key activity centers and facilitation of regional and subregional travel: 

Route 6 corridor in Orange, Westchester & Putnam Counties.

Route 6N corridor in Putnam County. 

Route 9 corridor throughout the Hudson Valley. 

Route 9D corridor in Dutchess, Putnam and Westchester Counties. 

Route 9H corridor in Columbia County. 

Route 9W corridor in Rockland, Orange and Ulster Counties.

Route 17A corridor in Orange County. 

Route 17K corridor in Orange County. 

Route 17M corridor in Orange County. 

Route 22 corridor throughout region. 

Route 28 corridor in Ulster County. 

Route 32 corridor in Orange County. 

Route 42 corridor in Orange County. 

Route 44 corridor in Ulster and Dutchess Counties 

Route 52 corridor in Putnam, Orange and Dutchess Counties

Route 55 corridor in Ulster and Dutchess Counties. 

Route 59 corridor in Rockland County. 

Route 82 corridor in Dutchess County. 

Route 94 corridor in Orange County. 

Route 97 corridor in Orange County. 

Route 100/100c corridor in Westchester County. 

Route 117 corridor in Westchester County. 

Route 199 corridor in Dutchess County. 

Route 202 corridor in Rockland County. 

Route 207 corridor in Orange County.

Route 208 corridor in Orange County. 

Route 209 corridor in Ulster and Orange Counties. 

Route 299 corridor in Ulster County. 

Route 302 corridor in Orange County. 

Route 304 corridor in Rockland County, Route 308 corridor in Dutchess County. 

Route 311 corridor in Putnam County. 

SIGNED STATE BICYCLE ROUTES

Currently only three of the state bicycle routes shown on this map in the Hudson Valley are signed: State Bike Routes 5, 9 and 17. Bicycle routes are shared travel lanes where motorists and bicyclists must respect each others legal rights to "share the road". 

In order to increase safety and riding pleasure signed state bike routes generally follow state highways with four feet or more of shoulder width. However, there are sections of the signed bicycle routes without shoulders. In these sections bicycle warning/shared roadway signs are used. State signed bike routes will continuously be improved over time. State signed Bicycle Routes are intended for experienced adult bicyclists who can share the road with motorized traffic and are primarily for transportation purposes. For more information and a map of Bike Route 9 contact the NYSDOT at (845)431-5723. 

State Bike Route 5 

State Bike Route 5 begins in Buffalo and continues east along the New York State Barge Canal/Mohawk River Corridor to the Massachusetts State Line. In Columbia County State Bike Route 5 travels along State Route 20.

State Bike Route 9-Hudson Valley Greenway Bike Route

State Bike Route 9, a 340 mile bike route from New York City to Montreal has been developed. A 124 mile long section of Bike Route 9 runs through the Hudson Valley. Bike Route 9 was signed and open as of September 1995. Bike Route 9 is an interstate (NY/NJ) and international (US/Canada) facility composed of mostly State I highways, local roads in some areas and trailways/bike paths in State park lands. 

The NYSDOT in cooperation with the Hudson Valley Greenway Council and others have developed this signed State bike route. State Bike Route 9 in the Hudson Valley is a designated part of the Hudson River Greenway Trail System. The following brief route description covers only die section of signed New York State Bike Route 9 in the Hudson Valley. 

New York State Bike Route 9 begins in New York City crosses the George Washington Bridge, and then follows Route 9W through northern New Jersey. The route continues mostly along Route 9W in Rockland County. In some places the Route provides alternative routing to Route 9W running along the river on local roads and trailways. The Route crosses the Bear Mountain Bridge, then continues on Route 9D through Putnam and Dutchess Counties. The Route follows Vassar Road (County Road 77), then enters the City of Poughkeepsie on Route 376. The Route uses local streets in the City then heads north in Dutchess County on Route 9 to Columbia County. In Columbia County the Route follows Route 9 then Route 9J, to Albany and north. 

State Bike Route 17 

As part of a larger NYSDOT effort. Stare Bike Route 17 begins in Buffalo and continues across the southern tier of New York State entering Orange County. The section of this route in Orange County follows state highways and passes many historic and scenic sites. State Bike Route 17 enters Orange County on Route 97 and then follows Route 6 east through Port Jervis to Middletown. The bike route then continues on Route 6/17M to Goshen. At Goshen the bike route continues east on Route 207 to the City of Newburgh. The bike route continues on Washington Street, then follows Marine Drive along the Hudson River and crosses the Hudson River via the Newburgh-Beacon Bridge on a separate bicycle/pedestrian facility. Bike Route 17 ends in Dutchess County where it intersects with Bike Route 9 near the City of Beacon. 

HUDSON RIVER BRIDGE CROSSINGS 

George Washington Bridge - Cross the Hudson River in New York City via the upper deck south pedestrian/bicycle pathway.

Contact: New York-New Jersey Port Authority Phone: 1-800-221-9903 

Tappan Zee Bridge - no bicycle/pedestrian access. 

Bear Mountain Bridge - full bicycle and pedestrian access. The Appalachian Trail crosses here. New York State Bridge Authority 

Hamilton Fish Newburgh-Beacon Bridge Bicycle/pedestrian access via a pathway on the south side of the bridge. New York State Bridge Authority 

Franklin D. Roosevelt Mid-Hudson Bridge Bicycle/pedestrian access via a pathway on the north side of the bridge. New York State Bridge Authority 

Kingston-Rhinecliff Bridge - Bicycles may use the bridge with prior approval from the New York State Bridge Authority. No pedestrian access. 

Rip Van Winkle Bridge - Bicycle and pedestrian access. New York State Bridge Authority. Contact: New York State Bridge Authority Phone:(914) 691-7245.

Request a paper version of this map:

Hudson Valley Bikeways & Trailways (Free)
NYSDOT - Region 8
Mr. James Rapoli
Region 8 Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator
Eleanor Roosevelt State Office Building
4 Burnett Boulevard
Poughkeepsie, NY 12603-2594
Phone:(845) 431-5991
E-mail:jrapoli@gw.dot.state.ny.us