Bicycle Blueprint
Introduction

NYC Cycling
1. NYC Bike Policy
2. State of NYC Cycling
3. Cyclists & Streets
A Bike and a Prayer


Riding Infrastructure
4. Street Design
5. Bridges
6. Road Surfaces
7. Greenways
8. Parks
9. Bicycles and Transit
10. Reducing Traffic


Security
11. Bicycle Theft
12. On-Street Parking
Indoor Parking


On the Job Cycling
14. Bicycle Messengers
Fifth, Park & Madison
15. Freight Cycles
16. Gov't Cycling


Reducing Risks
17. Accidents
Three Who Died
18. Air Pollution


Bicycle Education
19. Schools
20. Public Education


Appendices

      Chapter 13:
Indoor Bicycle Parking
a) Why Indoor Access
 Gaining Indoor Bicycle Access
c) Creating Indoor Bicycle Parking
d) Garage Parking
e) Mandatory Building Access
f) Chapter 13 Recommendations
Sidebar: Bicycle Lockers
Figure 13: Demonstrations of Bike Parking

Gaining Indoor Bicycle Access

Read the latest news on this subject.

Provided that approval has been secured from the employer or manager in the immediate work area, the question is one of access to the building itself. Many New York City building managements refuse to admit bicycles to buildings or elevators. Reasons vary, but typically include concerns over cleanliness, elevator capacity, obstruction, accidents and liability, fear of tenant complaints, and image. [2]

Under a common but by no means universal compromise, cyclists are given access to freight elevators (usually via a rear entrance) during normal business hours (generally excluding the lunch hour, when many close down), and are sometimes permitted to use passenger elevators during evenings or on weekends. While cyclists are almost always grateful for any such dispensations, these smack of second-class treatment and today must often be negotiated individually and even surreptitiously.

In addition, many building managers, particularly in high-rent districts in Manhattan, bar bicycles altogether, though they may permit heavy traffic in hand trucks and dollies in freight elevators, lobbies and hallways. [3] Many fail to realize that a bicycle's wheels, which travel the same turf as pedestrians' feet, are generally no dirtier than the bottom of the average employee's shoes.

Bike-banning building managers formerly included the Department of General Services (DGS), the city agency that owns, operates and leases buildings for the City of New York. City transportation officials prevailed upon DGS to open the doors of 39 city-owned buildings in four boroughs to bicyclists, beginning in April 1991. However, promotion by DGS has been lackadaisical, and it is not clear whether bike commuting to these buildings has increased.

NOTES:
2. “Sid's First Commute” by Jeff Della Penna in the Mar/Apr 1991 City Cyclist, offers a humorous fictional account of a confrontation between a bicycle-commuting building owner and his own security guards.
3. A Transportation Alternatives board member arriving with his bicycle at the Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority's Columbus Circle office for an evening meeting to discuss bicycle policy was refused admission, even though the bike was a folding, hand-carried model. This incident, in Nov. 1991, is not atypical.


a) Why Indoor Access
 Gaining Indoor Bicycle Access
c) Creating Indoor Bicycle Parking
d) Garage Parking
e) Mandatory Building Access
f) Chapter 13 Recommendations
Sidebar: Bicycle Lockers
Figure 13: Demonstrations of Bike Parking